Displaying 1 - 10 of 11 Forum Posts1 2 Next
  • May 30, 2019 06:26 PM
    Last: 14d
    222

    Yeah, you read that correctly. There seems to be a growing trend of seniors skipping retirement homes, and instead opting to live out the rest of their lives on luxury cruise liners. Just the thought at least makes retirement not so bleak, in my opinion. The exact amount of seniors retiring on ships is hard to figure out, but I would say enough to warrant inquiry from the media. A little excerpt from an article about:

    "It's estimated that cruise ships had 25.3 million passengers in 2017 and about half were between the ages of 50 and 74. A survey from 2018 found that baby boomers and seniors were the most active cruise ship travelers. However, the cruise ship industry doesn't track those who live on board full-time vs. occasional travelers."

    There's enough of a conversation about this trend that even the cruise lines are responding to it. Oceania created a package for seniors which lets them live for 58 or 72 days, that way they can avoid the cold. It's called the "Snowbirds in Residence" for that reason. Some ships have created permanent residency cabins for retirees. The ship called "The World" has 165 of those rooms, another one called the "Utopia" will offer 190 such cabins.

    I think this is a really neat idea. I would even consider it if I ever reach the point of retirement. The benefits of not having to pay for a mortgage, utilities etc could make this a more affordable venture, possibly. What does everyone else think?

  • May 07, 2019 05:08 PM
    Last: 1mo
    512
    I'm not surprised to see those states in the top 3. Cities in the last list aren't necessarily known for their beauty either. No offense to those who live in them. I do hear that Colorado is especially a nice state to retire in, especially for what health benefits the climate and altitude provides. Florida has always been known to be a retirement state. I was surprised that it still makes the list. I guess I figured the cost of living might have gone up considerably in the past decade, but then again, it all depends on where in the state you choose to retire.
  • May 13, 2019 05:17 PM
    Last: 1mo
    307
    True, it's a very complicated subject. There's so much info to track down, and so many ways to apply it to one's life and circumstances. Healthcare alone can be just as tricky. Just like you said we need to consider how inflation and current lifestyle factors into future plans, the same can be said for healthcare costs. It's easy to forget how cushy some insurance plans are through an employer, that it's easy to forget how much they actually cover. Anyone retiring should think about, their current health, and that of their partner, family members or spouse. Investing in a health savings account is definitely a good idea. Medicare and supplemental health insurance both have their pros and cons financially. I would say to give yourself an ample amount of time to shop around for coverage that better suites you.
  • May 02, 2019 04:02 PM
    Last: 1mo
    519
    Agreed, although I would like to see something like this, I don't find it very likely.
  • May 02, 2019 04:02 PM
    Last: 1mo
    519

    Today I've been doing a little bit of web research, and found myself diving down the rabbit hole of income taxes. Specifically, I've been reading up on the differences between the U.S. and other countries, namely Denmark. Denmark is considered a welfare state which leaves many U.S. citizens polarized on the topic. Danes pay 45% of their income in taxes, which is the third highest in the world. The average American pays 25.6% of their income in taxes. Which is an insane difference. Yet, when you dive into the 'why' of the matter, the idea is intriguing to say the least.

    To quote an article I read:

    "The reason behind the high level of support for the welfare state in Denmark is the awareness of the fact that the welfare model turns our collective wealth into well-being. We are not paying taxes. We are investing in our society. We are purchasing quality of life."

    In exchange for paying more in taxes, Danes enjoy free college tuition, and fully funded health care. Many are arguing that this is the main reason why Denmark is #2 on the World Happiness Report. U.S. is #19 in case anyone was wondering. So the question I would like to pose is pretty obvious. Would the U.S. benefit from a setup like this one? We are rather large in comparison to Denmark, perhaps their size has something to do with it as well.

    Personally, I do not see Americans jumping on board for something like this. It's a cultural thing. Then you have the argument that our government would just use the extra money to fund things we don't want or care about. What does everyone else think?

  • Apr 24, 2019 05:14 PM
    Last: 2mo
    492
    I don't think it would go to the extremes to where it would further hurt those seeking relief from the plan. What would be the point if it would only further financial difficulties?
  • Apr 24, 2019 05:14 PM
    Last: 2mo
    492
    I wonder how likely this will be. You know so many departments and agencies propose plans, only to seem them fall apart or end up an a perpetual state of negotiations. I guess that's sort of their job, to make proposals and fight for them. At any rate, I that one drawback that you mentioned, is a pretty big one. "The first few years?" I really hope the treatments get cheaper after that, otherwise people could get stuck in expensive treatments.
  • Apr 16, 2019 06:00 PM
    Last: 2mo
    2.4k
    JFoster Wrote:

    Does anyone else agree, or has the tax code gotten so out of whack that it's impossible now?

    Call me a pessimist, but I believe the 6% number is very telling. So many factors come into play through many unique lives. I would say for the majority of folks, that "magic zero" is almost impossible. I myself would consider just owing the government a 100 bucks or so a victory. Again, call me a pessimist. Wink
  • Dec 26, 2018 06:54 PM
    Last: 5mo
    3.3k
    JFoster Wrote:
    J.K.Logic Wrote:

    Look out though, Overton window works both ways.. wonder what the right will start saying they want, to combat this tactic.

    Very true. I'm thinking perhaps they'll move more towards supporting ideas and reforms that would protect private insurance companies.
    And don't forget the pharmaceutical companies. They'll probably say it will make drug prices skyrocket.
  • Dec 24, 2018 06:46 PM
    Last: 6mo
    12k
    Thanks for the video. Although, I'm not excited about the age increase. I know you said it will stop at 67, but I have a feeling, we'll be seeing it in the 70's by I get ready to retire. Especially with advances in modern medicine, people will be able to work longer. Which is kind of sad to think about.