Displaying 41 - 50 of 407 Forum PostsPrev 3 4 5 6 7 Next
  • Jan 12, 2021 09:14 PM
    Last: 3d
    144

    The House of Representatives are voting on an unprecedented second impeachment of President Donald Trump, days after he incited a deadly riot that culminated in his protesters storming the United States Capitol in an unprecedent act of insurrection and sedition against the United States government.

    The deadly attack left five people dead, including a Capitol Hill police officer.

    No President in our nations history has ever been impeached twice, making Donald Trump the first (and hopefully only) President to be saddled with that asterisk.

    While it may strike some as odd that Congress moving to impeach Donald Trump with so letter time left in his term, it does in fact make perfect sense because a conviction in the United States Senate could bar him from seeking office ever again if the Senate also votes to do so.

    Multiple House, and perhaps more importantly, Senate Republicans have come out in favor of Trump's impeachment or pleaded on him to resign.

    I'm certainly not a betting man, but I have to admit I think there's a very real shot enough Senate Republicans will jump on board to convict Trump. None other than Republican Leader Mitch McConnell privately told his Republican colleagues that he was "pleased" the House is moving to impeach Trump because it will make it easy for Republicans to "purge" him from the party. If Trump has lost McConnell then anything can happen in the Senate trial.

    What do you think? Is the House smart to move ahead with impeachment days before Trump is set to leave office or was what he incited on 1/6/2021 so terrible that it requires his immediate removal no matter how many days he has left in office?

  • Jan 11, 2021 09:13 PM
    Last: 5d
    15k

    It's a great idea, especially in sparsely populated areas, but we also need to think on a more grand scale. Any college town with a football stadium should set up shop on the field. Any professional football field and arena should set up shop. State fair grounds in all 50 states should set up shop.

    In my opinion, drive-thru vaccination sites should really only be used in areas that don't have the infrastructure to give mass vaccinations.

  • Jan 11, 2021 03:05 PM
    Last: 5d
    33k

    Primary care physicians will also be able to give the vaccine when it becomes more readily available.

    I also read that many states are allowing dentists to give the vaccine to their patients, as well.

  • Jan 05, 2021 07:53 AM
    Last: 11d
    1.3k

    Democrats swept both races, giving the Democratic Party an effective majority in the Senate with Vice-President elect Harris being able to cast any tie-breaking vote in the next Congress.

    This will have huge implications on the ability of President-elect Biden to pass his legislative priorities because now Senator Mitch McConnell won't be able to block any proposed legislation from reaching the floor. Not just that, but now Democrats will be in charge of every Congressional committee, which is where all major pieces of legislation are debated and written.

    Perhaps most importantly, Democrats will now be able to fill any judicial vacancy that comes up during Joe Biden's first two years as President. That alone is something that will have ramifications long past the President-elects tenure.

  • Jan 06, 2021 04:19 PM
    Last: 10d
    319

    An unruly and armed mob stormed the Capital building in Washington, D.C. while members of the House and Senate were meeting to certify the results of the Electoral College in the 2020 Presidential Election. At least one person was shot.

    The anarchists stormed the Capital by the hundreds, sending both chambers into lockdown before being evacuated to undisclosed locations by Capital police.

    This needs to be called what it is - an illegitimate coup attempt by anarchists intent on overturning a free and fair election that they handily lost. Period. End of sentence.

    What a sad, sad day for our country.

  • Dec 28, 2020 08:06 PM
    Last: 19d
    1.9k

    Leader McConnell will only allow this to move forward if 12 (or more) Republican Senators publicly or privately come forward to say they are on board with the additional money. I'm not saying it's not going to happen, but I will be surprised if it does.

    If they do somehow come to an agreement then the next question is how quickly they do. If they make an agreement to drastically raise the amount of the 2nd stimulus check in the next day or two then the government enact the changes before checks start to get sent out. However, if they don't then what is likely to happen is people will have to wait to get the additional money until they file their 2020 Federal income taxes.

    Again, I'm not holding my breath that 12 Republican Senators are going to get behind this legislation. I think it's highly unlikely, but then again my predictions have been proven incorrect a number of times these past four years.

  • Dec 20, 2020 06:49 PM
    Last: 18d
    9k

    We finally know how the checks will be calculated.

    The checks will be $600 for more Americans, with an additional $600 per eligible dependent. Individual filers making up to $75,000 would be eligible for the entire $600, but that number decreases the more money you make, phasing out entirely at $99,001. The numbers are doubled for couples filing jointly. Heads of household who make up to $112,500 will get the full amount, which is phased out at $136,501.

    Basically everything is the same as the first stimulus check, but it's just cut in half. The only difference is qualifying dependent children will get $600 instead of $500 each. However, a qualified dependent must be under 17, which is the same as the first round of stimulus checks.

  • Dec 20, 2020 06:49 PM
    Last: 18d
    9k

    After months of on again, off again negotiations, Congressional leaders have finally reached an agreement to send out an additional round of stimulus checks to most Americans. The 2nd stimulus check will be $600 for most Americans and will follow the same income model as the first round of checks. Qualified dependents will also be eligible for an additional $600 each.

    While I'm happy that Congress has finally reached a deal, I personally think that $600 is a woefully inadequate amount of money and doesn't come close to meeting the needs of millions of people who are struggling for no fault of their own. But I guess some money, even if it's much lower than I'd like to see, is better than nothing at all.

    What do you think about the deal? Are you glad Congress finally came together to send out a 2nd stimulus check or are you disappointed?

  • Dec 09, 2020 07:45 PM
    Last: 1mo
    761

    Two proposals, one by the Trump Administration and one by a bipartisan group of Senators, to stimulate the faltering economy have been put forward and only one of them contains any mention of stimulus checks.

    The proposal put forward by the Trump Administration would give most Americans $600, half of what most received in their first check. Qualifying dependents would also receive $600. What Trump's proposal doesn't contain is the additional weekly unemployment benefit that has helped many people unemployed for no fault of their own.

    On the other side, a bipartisan group of Senators released their compromise stimulus bill and it did not include any additional stimulus checks for Americans. Instead, the Senate bill focused on the unemployed, providing an additional $300/week in benefits for up to sixteen weeks.

    What do you think? Do you agree more with the Senate bill that focuses more on the unemployed or do you think we should get a second stimulus check?

    Personally, I think Congress should do both, but if I had to choose one I would rather make sure unemployed Americans continue receiving assistance considering the vast majority of them are unemployed for no fault of their own.

  • Dec 01, 2020 12:55 PM
    Last: 2mo
    506

    The Electoral College meets in the various states to cast their ballots that will officially declare President-elect Biden the winner of the 2020 Presidential election, but that isn't the final word. That lies with Congress, who will come together for a joint session on January 6, 2021 to officially certify the Electoral College vote. The occasion is typically a quiet formality, but if these past four years have taught us anything it's that quiet formalities aren't in President Trump's DNA.

    Here's what happens when the House and Senate meet to certify the election: The two houses meet in the House chamber on January 6, 2021, three days after the 117th Congress is sworn in. If one Congressperson and one Senator join forces to dispute a single (or dozens) of electors then the two houses must retreat to their chambers to debate for no more than two hours where the challenged electors will be voted on separately in each chamber.

    If the two chambers disagree then that's when things could get tricky. It's never happened since the passage of the 1887 law called the Electoral Count Act which established our current system for certifying Presidential elections, but the vast majority of Constitutional scholars are confident the matter then goes back to governors in the disputed states the power to certify the electors, which would almost certainly benefit the Democrats.

    Ok. All the "worst case scenario" stuff is now out in the open.

    Here's why it's extremely unlikely that Congress will overrule the Electoral College: In short - the math simply isn't on Republican's side. Sure, one Senator can join forces with a House Republican to force each chamber to go into debate, but that is almost certainly going to be more about theatrics than anything else.

    Republicans will only be swearing in 51 Senators to Democrats 48 due to a runoff election in Georgia (Senator Kelly Loeffler, who is also facing a runoff, will still be sworn in because she is currently filling in for former Senator Johnny Isaacson, whose term ends in January 2023).

    Add in the fact that Republican Senators Lisa Murkowski, Susan Collins, Mitt Romney, Ben Sasse, and Bill Cassidy have all publicly called Joe Biden the President-elect and you can see that any effort to swing the Electoral College vote Trump's way is far more about theatrics than anything else.