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Medicaid Providers Vary Greatly Depending on the State You Live In

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    It's an unfortunate thing, but Medicaid isn't the same in all fifty states. Some states (31 as of today) decided to expand their Medicaid program after the passage of the Affordable Care Act, but that means that 19 states haven't expanded their Medicaid program and are continuing to accept far fewer new enrollment's than the states who did expand their program.

    Regardless of the state you reside in, it's important to apply for Medicaid if you even have the slightest idea that you may qualify for it. It's free to apply and the worst that they will say is "no."

    If you are accepted into Medicaid then the next thing you'll need to do is find a provider who will accept Medicaid patients. The easiest way to do this is to use the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services "Physician Compare" tool. Then you just need to type in your city or zip code and then type in "Medicaid Providers" into the search bar and you will be taken to a page that shows all of the Medicaid providers in your area.

    Has anyone used this tool yet? Did you find it easy to use and find a provider in your area or was it still difficult to find a provider who would accept Medicaid in your area?

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    I don't qualify for Medicaid, but I do share your frustration that a good chunk of states decided not to expand it. I have a feeling that most of the individuals in those states that didn't expand Medicaid don't necessarily have the resources to just up and move to a state that did expand Medicaid.

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    I just have a hard time accepting that an invisible line can determine if you qualify to receive health coverage or not. It seems so unfair.

    Let's just look at California versus Texas for a second. asdfadsf

    California (total population: 38.8 million)

    • 40 percent reduction in their uninsured rate after expanding Medicaid
    • 3,392,540 new Medicaid or CHIP enrollees after expanding Medicaid

    Texas (total population: 26.96 million)

    • One of the highest uninsured rate in the entire nation at 16.9 percent
    • 176,922 new Medicaid or CHIP enrollees after expanding Medicaid.

    So if you are struggling and live in California then at least you don't have to lose sleep about being able to see a doctor if you become ill, but if you are struggling and live in Texas then you do. That just doesn't seem right to me.

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    Deraj Wrote: Has anyone used this tool yet? Did you find it easy to use and find a provider in your area or was it still difficult to find a provider who would accept Medicaid in your area?
    I haven't needed to use the tool, but I do know a couple family members who have and they said it was really simple. I would definitely suggest trying it out if you are having trouble finding a doctor who will take Medicaid patients.