Forum Thread

More about the $600 supplemental unemployment

Reply to ThreadDisplaying 2 Posts
  • Are you sure you want to delete this post?
        
    Is there a calculator that can figure out how much a person can work for each state? I live in North Dakota and got laid off due to the pandemic. I receive $218.00 a week unemployment. I understand there is a certain amount you can work before any at all of your benefits are reduced. And I myself worked 6 hours last week to help at the job I was laid off from and is still receiving the full amount. Based on using mine as an example, how much can I make a week and still draw the required $1 unemployment and still receive the $600 a week supplemental benefits? And is there a calculator out there I can pass on to my North Dakota friends that can help them?
  • Are you sure you want to delete this post?
        
    Marley Wrote: Based on using mine as an example, how much can I make a week and still draw the required $1 unemployment and still receive the $600 a week supplemental benefits? And is there a calculator out there I can pass on to my North Dakota friends that can help them?

    From what I understand, everyone who qualifies for unemployment benefits in their state will receive an additional $600 per week on top of the weekly amount their state awarded them. This additional $600/week is retroactive to March 29 and will end July 31 unless Congress extends the deadline.

    When it comes to your other question, I dug a little bit into the ND Unemployment guide and I couldn't find specific information about the number of hours you can work part-time and still receive your full $218.00 benefit, but it does seem like the vast majority of states allow recipients to work part-time, but with a catch.

    Here's what Nolo.com (a do-it-yourself legal books and software company) has to say about it:

    To figure out your weekly benefit amount, your state's unemployment agency will calculate how much you would receive if you were completely unemployed. (For information on how states make this calculation, see How Much Will I Get? Calculating Unemployment Compensation.) Then, the state will subtract what you are actually earning each week, less a small allowance. Most states let applicants keep a little bit of what they earn, without reducing their benefit amounts, to encourage people to take occasional work. The difference is your weekly partial unemployment benefit.