Displaying 1 - 10 of 199 Forum Posts1 2 3 4 5 Next
  • Mar 07, 2017 01:57 PM
    Last: 4d
    1.4k

    The Congressional Budget Office just released their score on the revised AHCA and it wasn't pretty. They project that 23 million Americans would lose health coverage if this bill were to become law. That makes it even more unlikely that the Senate will pass the House bill without major revisions.

  • Feb 28, 2017 02:01 PM
    Last: 5d
    5.1k
    J.K.Logic Wrote:

    News on this front, and it's not good:

    Trump budget: $800 billion in Medicaid cuts

    Boils down to a proposal of slowly cutting federal funding until it's down by 25% by 2026.

    The silver lining is that this proposal is almost certainly not going to become law, but it does show where the Administrations priorities are when it comes to funding Medicaid.
  • Mar 07, 2017 01:57 PM
    Last: 4d
    1.4k

    To my surprise, the Republicans were able to squeak out passage of an amended version of the AHCA, but that was the easy part. The Senate will very likely write a dramatically different bill that may be hard for hard line conservatives in the House to vote for.

    I have been wrong before, but I wouldn't be surprised if this winds up being a lot more difficult than our Representatives and Senators thought.

  • May 02, 2017 04:20 PM
    Last: 12d
    807

    It's a shame that lower income families are always the ones who take the brunt of any budget deal. Making sure families have food on their tables shouldn't be a political football.

  • Apr 24, 2017 07:01 PM
    Last: 10d
    637

    This is a program that is administered by a private company, so it's not surprising that HUD doesn't inform anyone about it.

    I won't advertise for a private company, but if you think you are eligible for the discounted internet rate then I encourage you to contact the company.

  • Mar 28, 2017 05:52 PM
    Last: 1mo
    24k
    Gdg Wrote:

    A question. I may need to retire next year which is my full retirement age, but if I waited until 70, my benefit would be significantly higher. However, company reorganization will force me to retire. So, the plan is to retire at 66 and wait until 70 to collect. The question is whether or not my benefit would remain the same at 70 as it would be at 66 because I would no longer be contributing. Or, would it increase as it would if I were still working and contributing because the government would have the benefit of holding on to my money (as paultry as it is) longer. I have my 40 quarters already locked in.

    And, if I do find work, I would likely not earn as much, so is the social security benefit based on the highest earning years?

    It's a little complicated, but the short answer is that your benefits will be calculated based off the earnings of your most profitable 35 years of employment.

    The Social Security Administration has various retirement calculators that allow you to put in your financial information and figure out what your benefits will be when you choose to start receiving them.

    I'd suggest starting with that and then contacting the SSA if you need any further clarification.

  • Apr 17, 2017 04:03 PM
    Last: 27d
    478

    Saving for retirement can be difficult, but one of the easiest things you can do is invest in a 401k if your employer offers one and is willing to match up to a certain amount. If you don't then you are literally throwing away free money being offered to your by your employer.

    Many employers will contribute to their employees 401k in one of four ways - a percentage match, a "fixed" match, a set contribution, or using a special formula. Out of these four, the percentage match is the most common in the workplace.

    A percentage match is when your employer will match whatever amount you contribute to your 401k up to a predetermined percentage. If your employer says they will match your contribution up to 6% of your salary and you are able to manage that much then you are actually setting aside 12% of your salary each paycheck. So if you make $40,000 a year, contribute 6% to your 401k and your employer matches, then you just saved $4,800 in one year.

    If you can't afford to contribute the maximum amount for whatever reason then just contribute whatever you can because the money does start adding up regardless if your employer is matching the full amount of a smaller amount.


    Is anyone currently enrolled in a 401k? If so, are you happy with it or do you think there's a better way to save for retirement?

  • Apr 05, 2017 05:23 PM
    Last: 2mo
    797

    I have conflicting opinions on this.

    On one hand, I struggle with the concept of the government handing over someones tax information to a third party. On the other, this program seems to be tailored towards individuals who haven't responded to the IRS's numerous communications to set up a payment plan to pay down their debt.

    It's very easy to set up a payment plan for debt owed to the IRS. I had to do it myself a few years ago and they worked with me to make it as easy as possible. They asked how much I could afford each month and then set up a plan for my tax debt to be paid off over three years. They also have plans that can spread out over an even longer period for people who owe a lot of money.

    That hasn't changed with this new program. All that's seemed to change is that the IRS is now sending the information of people who refuse to respond to their communications to a third party in order to try to obtain the tax debt that is owed to the government. As Benjamin Franklin famously said - "[I]n this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes.”

  • Apr 11, 2017 03:06 PM
    Last: 2mo
    9.2k
    That's a good question. I would suggest contacting the Social Security Administration and speaking with someone directly to ensure you get the most benefits you are eligible for.
  • Apr 08, 2017 09:43 PM
    Last: 2mo
    1.3k

    This is something I really wish the Federal government would step up more on. Invisible state lines shouldn't determine whether or not a child gets to go to Pre-K or if a family is able to put food on the table.