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Medicaid changes under the Trump Administration

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    Whether you fall on the left, right, middle or completely off the spectrum of politics altogether, the issue of properly funding Medicaid exists. And all 50 states along with the federal government need to continuously revamp, expand and amend the process to make sure it works.

    Enter the Trump administration. Republicans have been saying for years that they are going to repeal and replace Obamacare. And now that they have the power to theoretically do so politically, Medicaid is also going to have to be dealt with.

    So, how should the federal government approach the issue of funding Medicaid going forward? 46 governors and the Trump administration just recently sat down and talked about the country's future in regards to healthcare. And Medicaid is certainly a large portion of the concern here.

    Seems Republicans are in favor of block grants to states, giving each state a set amount to fund Medicaid, and leaving the states to fund the rest of the program themselves. This seems good in some ways, and risky in others. The good being there will be less bureaucracy for the states to get approval on how they allocate funds, making states more nimble and able to implement programs (ideally) much more streamlined and efficient, catered directly to their own state's unique health care needs.

    The bad of block grants is that states will have less funds earmarked specifically for Medicaid, leaving the door wide open for them to not allocate enough state funds into the Medicaid program to make up the difference sufficiently, and citizens will be left suffering and holding the bag (poor/partial coverage, exaggerated co-pays and other expenses that would've otherwise been handled by the program).

    Per Capita Caps is another idea being suggested, for how the federal government will supply funds to the states. It's essentially the same idea as block grants, it's just that the $$ is generated from how many people in any given state are currently in need of the program. So the same idea, limited funds but less red tape.

    I know little about the Democrats view on this subject, as I haven't felt the need as much to research it, as they are honestly not in power federally at the moment. So didn't seem as necessary to know. But I imagine many are for the federal government funding as much of Medicaid as possible, and making the process uniform and quality controlled across all 50 states.. is that about right?

    What do you think the Trump administration will do with Medicaid expansion and proposed changes? Also, ideally what do you think the administration SHOULD do?

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    I'm no fan of block grants because they will almost certainly not be fully funded and that leaves the most vulnerable among us with very little options if they get sick.

    To answer your question about what will happen - I continue to believe that nothing major is going to happen to Medicaid. It's too entrenched and Republicans in states whose populations rely disproportionately on Medicaid to receive healthcare will have a hard time voting to take away healthcare from their constituents unless they are prepared to commit political suicide.

    I won't be surprised if some minor tweaks are made to the program to try to give the appearance that the Republicans are doing something with the program, but I would be pretty surprised if they are able to do wholesale changes to the program because it's just too politically toxic to take away peoples healthcare (as Republicans are currently finding out with the Obamacare repeal debate).

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    justin412 Wrote:

    I'm no fan of block grants because they will almost certainly not be fully funded and that leaves the most vulnerable among us with very little options if they get sick.

    To answer your question about what will happen - I continue to believe that nothing major is going to happen to Medicaid. It's too entrenched and Republicans in states whose populations rely disproportionately on Medicaid to receive healthcare will have a hard time voting to take away healthcare from their constituents unless they are prepared to commit political suicide.

    I won't be surprised if some minor tweaks are made to the program to try to give the appearance that the Republicans are doing something with the program, but I would be pretty surprised if they are able to do wholesale changes to the program because it's just too politically toxic to take away peoples healthcare (as Republicans are currently finding out with the Obamacare repeal debate).

    I think that sounds about right. I haven't read hardly any single Republican wanting to take Medicaid away altogether. Everyone seems on board to keep it, it's just a matter of deciding what's the best way to fund it.
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    News on this front, and it's not good:

    Trump budget: $800 billion in Medicaid cuts

    Boils down to a proposal of slowly cutting federal funding until it's down by 25% by 2026.

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    J.K.Logic Wrote:

    News on this front, and it's not good:

    Trump budget: $800 billion in Medicaid cuts

    Boils down to a proposal of slowly cutting federal funding until it's down by 25% by 2026.

    The silver lining is that this proposal is almost certainly not going to become law, but it does show where the Administrations priorities are when it comes to funding Medicaid.