Forum Thread

Top Universities getting close to offering full, online degrees

Reply to Thread Displaying 4 Posts
  • Are you sure you want to delete this post?
        

    Mooc. One of my favorite things about the internet in the last few years. Stands for: massive, open, online course. And it's the future of higher education, far as I can tell. (that's sincerely my hope as well)

    Sure, we have online universities already. But aside from say, University of Phoenix, can you name one? Let alone, how many of you have heard of at least one story of someone getting completely lied to and screwed over by some fly by night, supposedly legitimate and accredited online campus? I've heard and read about dozens.

    Online universities have gotten a bad rap for a long time. Even when people do actually get the degree, it's widely understood that a majority of employers don't take them as serious degrees, over a brick and mortar, established institution.

    But something has been happening in the last 5 years or so that should grey all this up, and change the great divide between online and brick and mortar: mooc. Right now, top universities like Oxford, Yale, Harvard, etc are offering some of their exclusive (and usually very expensive) courses to anyone online, at little to no cost. Actually I think they are all free. And the demand is substantial.

    Tech education companies are gearing up now, getting the technology and interface all perfect, hoping for a big transition to happen, being that all the top universities will eventually and in the near future offer their highly coveted degrees to anyone, fully online.

    The University of Arizona has already paved the way here, sorta. You can purchase one year of accreditation for $1600, $200 a course x8, as one example. Imagine being able to get a Harvard/Yale/Oxford/Duke/insert awesome university here undergraduate degree, for pennies on the dollar? And they would be able to heavily discount this BECAUSE of the sheer numbers that would jump at the chance.

    Ask any professor if they would rather reach 250 students one time, in one lecture hall. Or 30,000 students online, taking the same class, all over the world, with the ability to rewind and rewatch the teacher's words as much as they like? I gotta imagine that for most circumstances, the professor would want as much reach as possible.

    This is extremely exciting for me. I have already taken a few mooc classes, and it's amazing to get access to Oxford and Yale professors, at no cost. I can't wait for the day, hopefully soon, that we will have the ability to purchase a course load, and I can theoretically have a crack at getting a heavily discounted degree from one of the most prestigious universities in the world. Imagine that?

  • Are you sure you want to delete this post?
        

    I'm just as excited about the future of online universities as well, but I think it's imperative for people to do their research before signing on the dotted line. The difference between for profit online universities and brick and mortars that offer online courses is vast.

  • Are you sure you want to delete this post?
        
    I hate to rain on the parade, but I still don't see this taking off. I recall some of my professors detesting the idea. Most, are old school, they prefer face-to-face lectures. Not to mention, it gives the students more ability to slack off. I've taken a few online classes. They're very convenient, yes, but they never made as much of an impact on me. They just felt more like easy credit opportunities.
  • Are you sure you want to delete this post?
        
    JFoster Wrote: I hate to rain on the parade, but I still don't see this taking off. I recall some of my professors detesting the idea. Most, are old school, they prefer face-to-face lectures. Not to mention, it gives the students more ability to slack off. I've taken a few online classes. They're very convenient, yes, but they never made as much of an impact on me. They just felt more like easy credit opportunities.

    At their infancy, sure. The easy classes go online. But the internet gets more sophisticated every day. And I'm sure not all old school professors will be wanting to do this exclusively. But that's not the idea here. The idea is that a normal person can one day have access to what used to be uber expensive and impossibly exclusive. Not to mention geographically limiting. You shouldn't have to live in New York, Cali, England or Boston to get that level of education, if the technology exists to make it universally available to all.

    And the brick and mortars can still run the same way they do now. It will just unbelievably expand their reach, for those that opt in. Hopefully one day, all will. Will mean a whole different kind of revenue stream as well.