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Deceased spouse benefits

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    If I retire at 66 on my late husbands benefit can I switch over at 70 to my higher benefit? I am remarried.
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    When it comes to receiving your survivors benefits, you shouldn't have to worry about being remarried as long as you were remarried after the age of 60. As long as you were remarried after the age of 60, the remarriage will not affect your eligibility for survivors benefits. However, if you remarry before the age of 60, you will not be eligible to collect your survivors benefits.

    So, in short, if you are eligible to receive survivors benefits, you could choose to retire on those benefits alone, allowing your own benefits to grow, and then switch to your retirement benefits later on, if it is higher.

    I hope that helps. Here is an article that has a nice breakdown, and here is a another one from the Social Security site.

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    SSA was the one to tell me I could draw from his, tho I remarried two years later at 49. So I guess I'll find out how this works when I apply.
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    Hi, My husband passed at the age of 50 (13yrs ago) and I was wondering how I can go about seeing if I have any current benefits coming at my age, which is 58, or when I can start getting his benefits.
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    Ofmgr421 Wrote: Hi, My husband passed at the age of 50 (13yrs ago) and I was wondering how I can go about seeing if I have any current benefits coming at my age, which is 58, or when I can start getting his benefits.

    You can start receiving reduced benefits as early as age 60, according to the Social Security website, as JFoster was also mentioning above.

    Survivors Planner: If You Are The Worker's Widow Or Widower

    It's similar to regular social security benefits: you can chose to take benefits early (age 60) and get a reduced monthly amount. Or you can wait until full retirement age (65-67 years old) and get the full amount of benefits. Full retirement age depends on when what year you were born:

    Social Security Benefit Amounts For The Surviving Spouse By Year Of Birth

    Hope this helps.

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    Thank you Bryce,

    My late husband was on disability, as he had cancer, how will this affect things?

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    Ofmgr421 Wrote:

    Thank you Bryce,

    My late husband was on disability, as he had cancer, how will this affect things?


    Good question. After some research on this, it doesn't seem that it would change anything, with one exception:

    Are you disabled yourself? If you are, you can begin claiming benefits on your spouse as early as age 50. Here's an exert of note on that:

    Spouse’s Survivors Benefit

    If a spouse was married for at least a year to a disabled worker who died while receiving Social Security disability benefits, the surviving spouse can get benefits in either of these circumstances:

    • The surviving spouse is 60 years old or older.
    • The surviving spouse is disabled and between 50 and 60.


    This benefit is sometimes called the widow or widower’s benefit. Note that the surviving spouse’s benefits will end if he or she remarries or becomes eligible to receive significantly higher Social Security benefits on his or her own record.


    Otherwise, it seems that spousal benefits from Social Security would work out to the same monthly payout, regardless of if he was on disability prior.

    Whenever you are ready, you can verify all this info by applying for benefits with this site:

    Apply Online for Retirement/Medicare Benefits

    Or call SSA directly, to make sure. That's your best bet. 1-800-772-1213. As you are close to being able to start taking early benefits, it would be best to chat with them about your options, and to get a really good understanding of how much you will be receiving monthly, so you can plan accordingly.